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  #1  
Old 24th November 2003, 06:41 AM
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How often to worm

Just another question. How often should I be worming Buster? I currently give him Drontal plus every 3 months. However a freind , who doesnt even bother to worm hers at all( small mongrel) said this is too often?
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  #2  
Old 24th November 2003, 07:05 AM
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Doesn't your vet do a fecal check? We don't worm dogs here unless they HAVE worms. I have not heard of worming on a regular basis. I'd check into a second opinion if I were you. Seems truly unnecessary to me if the dog isn't suffering from worms.

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Old 24th November 2003, 07:27 AM
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I have spoken to my vet and told her which brand I was using. I told her I planned to repeat his initial puppy dose after 3 months. Maybe there was a breakdown in communication? Im confused now.

 
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Old 24th November 2003, 07:41 AM
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Does your dog presently have worms? Has he been diagnosed with worms recently and under treatment currently? I'm confused.

If the dog doesn't have worms there is no need to give him medicine for worms. I personally have never heard of giving anything except heartworm medication yearly for worms. And I only give heartworm meds to my dogs during the 'mosquitoe season' when heartworm carrying mosquitoes may infect the dogs. But the heartworm meds are pretty standard in the US. Other worm meds are not necessary unless the dog is currently infected with pin worms, or other worms.

 
  #5  
Old 24th November 2003, 08:07 AM
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A lot of people do worm on a regular basis, but I'm with Dan - I can't for the life of me understand it. It's like putting your arm in a cast every so often, just in case there's a break you don't know about....

Have a fecal done - if it shows there are worms, then give the wormer. Otherwise, it's completely useless.

 
  #6  
Old 24th November 2003, 09:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by tanya22
Preventative medicine is NOT the same as putting a cast on a healthy limb. It is more like taking calcium so you have strong bones and are less likely to break yor arm. IMHO.
I have to respectfully disagree, we are not talking about taking a supplements, ie vitamins or calcium to complement nutrition, build a stonger immune system etc...
We are talking about medecine. Views do vary greatly on this I agree but, if you prefer, it is like taking antibiotics every month in case you get sick.... adding that there are also great natural alternatives for prevention. My 2 cents!

Catherine
(just to clarify I am talking about dogs, I have no knowlegde of horses)

 
  #7  
Old 24th November 2003, 09:33 AM
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Re: How often to worm

Quote:
Originally posted by busters mum
Just another question. How often should I be worming Buster? I currently give him Drontal plus every 3 months. However a freind , who doesnt even bother to worm hers at all( small mongrel) said this is too often?
Here, all vets suggest worming every 3 months and they use Drontal plus too; but i wouldn't worm Avra without reason and i havn't done it for 2 years now

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  #8  
Old 24th November 2003, 12:04 PM
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Well, Buster has not had a problem with them I was doing it as a precautionary measure and thought I was being responsible especialy with having children.
Busters breeder used natural methods for her dogs, such as garlic and I did carry this on with Buster as she had started him with it mixing a little in his food, but he went off it and wouldnt eat much with it .
On reading your posts some have IMHO I do not know what this means can you tell me?

 
  #9  
Old 24th November 2003, 12:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by busters mum
. . . On reading your posts some have IMHO I do not know what this means can you tell me?
IMHO = In My Humble Opinion.


 
  #10  
Old 24th November 2003, 12:42 PM
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oooohhhhh, yes I see it now. I told you all I was a technophobe and hopeless with this kind of thing! doh!

 
  #11  
Old 24th November 2003, 12:55 PM
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Quote:
Preventative medicine is NOT the same as putting a cast on a healthy limb. It is more like taking calcium so you have strong bones and are less likely to break yor arm.
I agree. Worming, however, is not preventive medicine. Worming is *treatment* - it does not prevent the dog from getting worms, it treats the worms the dog may have gotten. (Heartworm medicine is the same.)

If one were giving, say, garlic or ground pumpkin seeds on a regular basis to stave off a worm infestation, *that* would be considered preventive, much like calcium for strong bones.

 
  #12  
Old 24th November 2003, 06:21 PM
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This is the first I've heard of giving worm medicine just in case.

We always bring in a stool sample when we go to the vets. But for one instance with Ava, they have always been negative.

During Ava's third round of shots, they found coccicidia in her stool. Coccidia is found in puddles or small pools that have had bird droppings deposited in them, or puddles formed when rainwater carries bird droppings into a puddle. When a dog drinks from this water, the coccidia enter their body. They can also get it from their routine cleaning of paws that have been contaminated from walking on droppings.

As I understand it, Coccidia only poses a threat to very small puppies, or other animals. It leads to diarrhea which will quickly dehydrate a small puppy. The aforementioned only applies to animals with normally functioning immune systems.

While our vet felt that Ava was of sufficient size to deal with them on her own, she prescribed "birth control" pills for the worms so they wouldn't multiply.

Once a dog has had coccidia it will not contract them again even if it drinks contaminated water. It's immune system will fight them off before they get a foothold. Like measles and mumps in children, once they have had the disease, they will be immune to it unless their immune system is compromised.

But in the case of tapeworms, pinworms and whipworms as well as others, a pill today will not provide protection after the meds have been eliminated from the body. To my knowledge, most if not all treatments are some form of poison which kills the worms.

I'd be reluctant to put poison in my dog's system to protect against a rare problem. We've had several dogs in our lifetime and Ava is the only one that has had worms. Technically, I don't think coccidia is a worm, but I might be wrong.

One more thought, worms don't pose the same threat as parvo, distemper or rabies. It would take a long time for worms to do serious damage to a dog. You would notice changes in him long before then. If your dog seemed to be losing weight despite eating normally, or there were changes in his stools, in most cases worms are quickly treated, and the dog recovers quickly.


Tom