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  #1  
Old 19th January 2005, 08:58 AM
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"mahogany" boxer??

I saw listed a "mahogany" boxer puppy and was curious if that was a coat color. I've only ever known of fawn, brindle and white. I ALSO saw a listing for a black boxer. The mahogany dog looked like a really dark red fawn color. Are these ok by breed standards?? I've never seen it before and was curious about that. Thanks guys in advance.
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  #2  
Old 19th January 2005, 09:09 AM
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Yep, mahogany is fine as far as the breed standard goes. It is just a shade of fawn. I believe "Fawn" is described in the standards of all countries as ranging from a pale tan colour to a deep mahogany red. In some cases, red fawn is described as most desirable (meaning, I guess, that the pale tan and mahogany colours are less desirable).

If, however, your mahogany fawn is listed in the same place as the 'black', then I'd steer well clear of buying a puppy from that backyard breeder.
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  #3  
Old 19th January 2005, 09:16 AM
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ok I see. NO, the black dog was a different breeder. I just happened to be browsing around the internet last night and noticed that and I'd never in my life seen a black boxer before! Is that not a good thing for a boxer to be black? (I've only been a boxer-mom for 3 years if you couldn't tell! LOL)

 
  #4  
Old 21st January 2005, 09:09 AM
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I was just going to make a post about the darker fawn boxer. Austin is a BEAUTIFUL shade of fawn, he looks like a little cutie! He is a much darker shade than all of his litter mates but looks identical to his mother, as far as shading goes. I get comments all of the time like "I have never seen that color on a boxer before". I used to like the lighter fawn color better but now when I compare him to his sister, he is so much more striking and stands out much more. I love it! Could his coat be different because of his color, he does seem to be a little bit more coarse than his lighter colored sister?

 
  #5  
Old 21st January 2005, 10:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rsjenni
Could his coat be different because of his color, he does seem to be a little bit more coarse than his lighter colored sister?
Unlikely. Colour and texture are generally governed by different genes. Just as a contrast, most of the very red fawns I've seen tend to have very short and soft coats. Another observation - the "washed out" fawn colour tends to occur most often through the repeated breeding of fawns with fawns, especially flashy. It is dilution of overall pigmentation over time. In those populations where brindle is equally or more favoured, and less breeding for flashy markings occurs, you find a great many more of the deep red and mahogany fawns and very few pale tan

 
  #6  
Old 21st January 2005, 10:56 AM
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Well, if you want to know a little more, have a read of this post by Marimat: White boxer breedings
And here's the rest of the thread: White boxer breedings

Technically, that's a discussion about the breeding of white boxers and the effect on the whole population that would occur by further dilution of melanin by breeding dogs with two copies of the extreme white spotting gene (Sw). But the same principle (albeit to a lesser extent) applies to the breeding of flashy dogs together, which carry one copy of that gene - we get dilution of melanin, affecting both coat colour and organ pigmentation. Repeated breedings of that type result in diluted populations - where the coat colour is commonly a pale tan and unpigmented haws occur even on 'plains'. In other populations, where flashy dogs are less commonly bred, neither of those are common occurances.